Andrew J. Hanson's Home Page


Computer Science Program -- Emeritus
School of Informatics and Computing
Indiana University, Bloomington
   (IU -- OneStart System)

See also my page in the Indiana University Cognitive Science Program.

Here is my capsule biography, as well as a more detailed curriculum vita.


Address:
Andrew J. Hanson
Professor Emeritus of Computer Science
School of Informatics and Computing
Indiana University
Bloomington, IN 47405
U.S.A.
Office [+1] (812) 855-5855
LH215 Administrator [+1] (812) 855-6486
LH215 FAX [+1] (812) 855-4829
hansona (at) indiana [dot] edu
Generic URL: http://homes.soic.indiana.edu/hansona

My Erdös Number is 4, computed from Paul Erdös(0):Irving Kaplansky(1):Peter Freund(2):Tohru Eguchi(3):Andrew Hanson(4).

My Academic Genealogy traces back through Carl Friedrich Gauss, starting from my PhD thesis ("A Dual Resonance Model for Meson-Nucleon Scattering") under Professor Kerson Huang at MIT (August, 1971).

My Google Scholar Profile gives a nice picture of the various fields I have worked in. My DBLP Profile is another useful (but incomplete) list of my Computer Science publications compiled by the DBLP project.



Traditional Courses of Mine:

B581, Graduate Computer Graphics, taught about 30 times.

    Public B581 syllabus: Overview of B581.

This is an OpenGL-based course introducing the mathematical foundations and practical programming methods of modern interactive computer graphics. The homework involves coding in C using OpenGL and GLUT, and mastering the theoretical principles upon which OpenGL-like graphics is based. The course emphasizes creating interactive interfaces to help understand the graphics objects and techniques being studied. Lighting and simple material modeling are covered as an introduction to the creation of realistic images.


B689, Mathematical Modeling Methods, taught half a dozen times  

Public B689 syllabus: Overview of B689.

This course focused on Mathematica-based methods of producing rapid prototypes solving complex software modeling problems. This class will start with an introduction to the Mathematica programming environment, and will incorporate Mathematica prototyping methods implicitly into a broad survey of mathematical modeling methods, techniques, and folklore used widely throughout computer science, computer graphics, scientific visualization, mathematics, and physics.

 


Current Research

My most recent research focuses on several areas: Mathematical Physics, Applications of Quaternions, Human Interfaces and Effects on Learning, and Scientific Visualization.